First Game: Warhammer Fantasy 8th edition

Played my first 2 games of WFB 8th ed at the Intro Party Plastic Legions hosted.  The game is exactly what GW is looking for:  fun, fast and furious.   The new charge rules (base movement + 2D6) had the armies fighting by turn 2.  And the magic rules had wizards throwing mega powerful spells each turn (when they were not blown up by miss-cast).  Combat results where extreme with handfuls of casualties taken each turn – my high CR for the day was 20.  The new combat rules had all players throwing huge blocks of troops on the board.  I ran my Warriors of Chaos with a block of 50 Marauders + 3 units of Warriors, my Skaven opponent only  played 3 units and my Empire opponent fielded a 60 man spear unit with 2 detachments of 30 swordsmen! Both games were more or less over by the 4th turn as the large units smashed each other with dozens of attacks.

I find it funny that GW fixed all the things I hated about WFB when I started playing 10+ years ago.  Every model fights.  Movement is not figity.  Leadership is not the most important statistic.  The game is just like 40K, but different.  10 years later – I’ve grown accustomed to playing a game of blocks and movement. I expect leadership to be important and I like the fact that a plan is required.

The new edition plays so fast and smooth, the game almost plays itself – all the player needs to do is push the units forward and throw many, many dice.

Anyone up for Ancients?

Advertisements

  1. #1 by WQRobb on July 21, 2010 - 12:59 pm

    You ran a block of 50 Marauders, and this was a good idea? For me, 40K always felt like battling with green army men–it was about ducking behind cover and blasting things with guns. WHFB felt like chess: it was about maneuvering and coordination and sometimes thinking two or three turns ahead, which is why leadership was so important because if you one unit didn’t hold, everything else was jeopardized.

    Maybe I’m being crotchety about a game I haven’t seen, but you’re describing a game that doesn’t seem like the “thinking man’s game” WHFB was for me.

  2. #2 by Deano on July 23, 2010 - 8:35 am

    “WFB” = “thinking man’s game”. That is funny to hear. I totally agree with the article. All the stuff he hated about WFB is what I hated. The micro-inch movement, the uber commanders standing next to a brigade and killing them all, the dumb and not climatic charges. The magic “change the rules” attacks. I hated all of that. With this article I am not very interested in trying out the game after many, many, many years away from it. I just am not quite ready to plop down $75.00 or whatever for the Britannica Rule Book. Hopefully a soft cover will be out soon. Question – did you use the game aids? Are they worth it?

  3. #3 by chicagoterrainfactory on July 23, 2010 - 9:24 am

    Robb – a block of 50 Marauders (with great weapons) does sound ridiculous, doesn’t it! But now this block will fight 3 ranks deep, and all the casualties will be replaced by the back rank. This unit can take almost any number of dead and still fight at full effectiveness.

    WFB as chess is gone. The movement phase is little more than pushing units forward. All the bait and trap of prior editions is no more.

    Deano – I did not have any of the fancy new gadgets, but my opponents did. The combat resolution tracker was handy. With CR over 10 occurring in every combat (and over 20 in some fights) having a tool to track the results was handy.

    The box set, due out in September, will have a small version of the rule book.

    I’ll take this time to plug WAB 2 again. Its everything good that WFB used to be/could have been. I see me playing WFB only when it’s the only option for a game in my group.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: